FAQs

Planning and Development Response to Frequently Asked Questions

The following responses to Frequently Asked Questions provide answers to a wide range of planning and development matters relevant to the Ipswich Local Government Area. For more information on any question or answer outlined below, you can contact Council’s Planning and Development Department during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888, via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au or in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich.

FAQs Index

Ipswich Planning Scheme

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Legislation

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Property Information

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Development Applications

Preparing and Lodging a Development Application

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Public Notification for Impact Assessable Applications

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Other Development Matters

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Subdivision Plans

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Heavy Vehicle Parking

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Infrastructure Contributions

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Heritage

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Naming & Street Numbers

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Vegetation

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Other Matters

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Ipswich Planning Scheme

Why does Council have a planning scheme?

Planning schemes are prepared by local governments to provide an integrated planning policy for the future growth and development within a local government area.  Planning schemes perform a range of functions including –

  • Providing a strategic framework that guides development into the future;
  • Manages, facilitates and regulates change by detailing the outcomes sought in relation to certain parts of the local government area;
  • Allocates land for different types of land uses and major infrastructure;
  • Identifies areas or places that are valuable features or constrain the use of land; and
  • Identifies the types of development that may be suitable for an area and those that are unlikely to be supported.

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What is the Ipswich Planning Scheme?

The Ipswich Planning Scheme contains the framework for the management of development within the Ipswich Area.  It identifies areas for different types of development and provides a strategic direction for the location of infrastructure and different types of land uses (e.g. housing, shops, industries) within the Local Government Area.  The Ipswich Planning Scheme divides the Ipswich Local Government Area into 8 localities-

  • Urban Area
  • City Centre
  • Regionally Significant Business Enterprise and Industry Areas
  • Amberley
  • Rosewood
  • Township Areas
  • Rural Areas
  • Springfield

Each locality is further divided into Zones and in some cases, Sub Areas and Precincts, which all provide the intent for development within that particular area, and identify consistent and inconsistent development, as well as the relevant levels of assessment for different uses.

The planning scheme also provides a secondary organisational layer called Overlays, which are based on special attributes of land that need to be protected, or that may constrain development. There are two (2) types of overlays - character places overlays and development constraints overlays.  The Ipswich Planning Scheme mapping is available to be viewed in electronic format through PD Online.

Other key aspects of the Ipswich Planning Scheme include Planning Scheme Policies, Implementation Guidelines and Fact Sheets (which provide addition guidance on a range of planning scheme matters), the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) which sets out the strategic direction for infrastructure within the Local Government Area, and the Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.1) 2017 and associated infrastructure charging framework.

As the new State government planning legislation, the Planning Act 2016, commenced on 3 July 2017, Council will now commence preparation of a new Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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Legislation

What is the main planning legislation in Queensland?

Council’s planning is undertaken in the context of a hierarchy of State government planning instruments, including the Sustainable Planning Act 2009, the Planning Act 2016 and associated regulation and statutory instruments, the State Planning Policy and the broad strategic framework set by the South East Queensland Regional Plan. These State planning instruments provide the statutory basis for preparing local government planning schemes and the regulation and assessment of development proposals.

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What is the relationship between the Ipswich Planning Scheme and the SEQ Regional Plan?

The Planning Act 2016 provides for the making of policy for South East Queensland. The South East Queensland Regional Plan provides an integrated planning policy for the South East Queensland Region that takes precedence over local planning schemes. The main purpose of the South East Queensland Regional Plan is to manage regional growth and change.  If there is an inconsistency between the regional plan and a local planning scheme, the regional plan prevails to the extent of any inconsistency.

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What is the relationship between the Ipswich Planning Scheme and the State Planning Policy?

The State Planning Policy outlines the State government’s interests in land use planning and development. The State interests must be considered when making and amending planning schemes and in some cases, assessing development applications. The State Planning Policy also sets out the matters that must be considered by the State government before designating land for community infrastructure and in preparing and amending regional plans. If there is an inconsistency between a State planning policy and a regional plan or a local planning scheme, the State planning policy prevails.

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What is the process for amending the Ipswich Planning Scheme?

The Planning Act 2016, State Planning Policy and associated guidelines provide the framework for local plan making, which is the process of a local government preparing a new or amended planning scheme. The State planning instruments outline how planning schemes should be made or amended, what they must and/or should consider, and when public consultation on major changes is required. Council’s major planning scheme amendments are also required to undergo review by the State government (including Ministerial approval) to ensure they address relevant State interests.

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How can I view the Ipswich Planning Scheme?

The Ipswich Planning Scheme and associated mapping is available to be viewed in electronic format on PD Online. Alternatively, a hard copy of the Ipswich Planning Scheme can be viewed at the Planning and Development counter in Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich.

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What are the key matters affecting residential lot sizes in Ipswich?

There are a number of factors that influence and affect residential lot sizes within Ipswich. One of the key drivers is the density targets identified in the South East Queensland Regional Plan that are necessary to accommodate the predicted population within the South East Queensland region. Additionally, there are a number of other factors that locally affect lot sizes. Refer to Fact Sheet No. 8 – Residential Lot Sizes of the Ipswich Planning Scheme for more information.

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Property Information

How do I find out if I can develop a property?

PD Online allows users to search properties by address. Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. Your search results will show the zone and development constraints applicable to a particular property. More information on specific zones and constraints can be found in the Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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How do I find out the zoning for a property?

PD Online allows users to search properties by address. Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. Your search results will show the zone applicable to a particular property. More information on specific zones can be found in the Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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How do I find out what can be developed within a particular zone?

You can use the Ipswich Planning Scheme to determine what can be developed in a particular zone. In the zone code, particular uses will be identified as consistent or inconsistent. The relevant category of assessment (exempt, code or impact assessable) is also identified within the zone code.

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How can I find out if a property is affected by a development constraint (such as flooding or mining)?

PD Online allows users to search properties by address. Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. Your search results will show the development constraints applicable to a particular property.  More information on specific development constraints can be found in Part 11 – Overlays of the Ipswich Planning Scheme. Additionally, you can use the ‘Map Search’ or ‘Property Enquiry’ function within PD Online to view maps of particular development constraint overlays and where they affect a particular property or area.

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What is Council’s role in relation to Mining and Key Resource Areas?

The Queensland Government is responsible for approving and regulating mining activities. The Ipswich Planning Scheme identifies areas that are affected by Mining, which are generally as a result of historic underground or open cut mining within the Local Government Area, and Key Resource Areas, which the State Government has identified as areas of particular significance in relation to a specific resource and/or future mining. Through its development assessment function, Council seeks to avoid conflicts between mining and other land uses, particularly residential uses. Further information can be found in Fact Sheet 1 – Mining and Key Resource Areas of the Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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What flood regulations apply to development in Ipswich?

The Ipswich Planning Scheme identifies an Adopted Flood Regulation Line (AFRL), which is equivalent to the highest known flood event over a property.  The AFRL is predominately based on the historic 1974 Flood Level, the historic 2011 Flood Level or the modelled 1 in 100 Flood Level. Part 11.4.7 – Flooding and Urban Catchment Flowpaths of Part 11 – Overlays of the Ipswich Planning Scheme provides further information regarding the assessment and suitability of development that is proposed on a property identified as being affected by the Adopted Flood Regulation Line or an Urban Catchment Flow Path.

On 5 May 2017, the Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study was released by the Queensland Reconstruction Authority (QRA). The flood study area includes parts of the Brisbane River catchment, with a focus on flooding events downstream of Wivenhoe Dam including the Brisbane River, Lockyer Creek and the Bremer River system.  The contents of the flood study are currently being reviewed in the context of the Council’s Adopted Flood Regulation Line.

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How do I find out the extent to which a property is flood affected?

PD Online allows users to search properties by address.  Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number.  If a property is flood affected, the search results will show the property as being affected by the OV5 – Urban Catchment Flow Path, Adopted Flood Regulation Line or 1 in 20 Flood Development Line overlays.  Information on specific constraints can be found in Part 11 – Overlays of the Ipswich Planning Scheme.  Part 11.4.7 – Flooding and Urban Catchment Flowpaths of Part 11 – Overlays of the Ipswich Planning Scheme provides further information regarding the assessment and suitability of development that is proposed on a property identified as being flood affected.

Council also has a Flood Map information search tool which you can use to determine the extent of historic flooding that occurred on a specific property or locality.

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How do I find out what development approvals exist on a property?

PD Online allows users to search properties by address.  Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. Your search results will show the current and former town planning applications that have been lodged over a particular property, dating back to 1 January 2005. For more detailed information, there are a range of plumbing, building and town planning searches that you can request. More information regarding these searches, including the fees payable, is available on Council’s website.

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How do I find out if there is an easement on a property?

Council can advise if there is an easement on a certain property, to which Council are a party. This information is available by contacting Council’s Planning and Development Department. For detailed information regarding all easements on a particular property, it is recommended that you contact the Department of Natural Resources and Mines on 1300 255 750 and request a copy of the registered plan, or a title search, and any associated easement documents.

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Development Applications

Preparing and Lodging a Development Application

I am new to development. What do I need to know to get started?

Development in Queensland is regulated under the Planning Act 2016. At a local level, the Ipswich Planning Scheme provides most of the regulations concerning development within the Ipswich Local Government Area.  PD Online allows users to search properties by address. Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. Your search results will show the zoning and development constraints applicable to a particular property. Using the Ipswich Planning Scheme, you can determine what development may be suitable for a particular property. A development application may be required to carry out particular types of development.

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What is a development application?

In order to carry out certain types of developments, a development permit may be required. You can apply for a development permit by submitting a development application. A development application provides information to Council as the “assessment manager” about the proposed development, to enable Council to assess the application against the requirements of the Ipswich Planning Scheme and some State Government planning requirements.

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Do I need to lodge a development application if I want to undertake a development on a property?

Development applications are required if a development is considered assessable development under the Planning Act 2016, and identified in the Ipswich Planning Scheme as requiring code or impact assessment. To determine whether you need to lodge a development application for the development you wish to undertake on your property, you need to determine the zone that is applicable to your property. This can be done using PD Online. You can then use the Ipswich Planning Scheme to determine what can be developed in a particular zone. In the zone code, particular uses will be identified as consistent or inconsistent and as exempt, or requiring self, code or impact assessment. If a particular development requires code or impact assessment, you will be required to lodge a development application.

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Where can I get assistance in preparing a development application?

To receive help with preparing a development application you should contact a private town planner or surveyor to discuss the potential details and costs of a development application. You can also obtain development information by contacting Council’s Planning and Development Department on (07) 3810 6888, via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au or in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich. Council also offers a free pre-lodgement development advice service.

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Is it necessary to discuss an application with a Council officer prior to lodging a development application?

It is highly recommended that you engage with Council’s planning officers at the pre-lodgement stage to ensure that you are aware of the relevant Ipswich Planning Scheme provisions that are applicable to your development, and the information you need to include in your application. Free pre-lodgement advice can be provided over the telephone, via email or in a pre-lodgement meeting.

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Do I need to make an appointment if I wish to have a pre-lodgement meeting with Council’s planning staff?

While town planning staff are generally available to assist with enquiries at the Planning and Development counter during normal business hours (8am to 4.30pm), it is highly recommended that you make an appointment. This will allow the relevant Council officers to review your proposal and ensure that appropriate Council personnel (planning, engineering and environment staff) can be invited to the meeting to give feedback. To make an appointment, please contact Council during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888, via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au or request a meeting on Council’s website.

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Do I need to attend a pre-lodgement meeting in person?

No, you do not need to attend a prelodgement meeting in person. Pre-lodgement meetings can also be held over the telephone or as a web conference.

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How can I determine the level of assessment for a development application?

The level of assessment is specified in the Ipswich Planning Scheme and will depend upon the type of land use proposed, the zone of the subject property and whether there are any development constraint overlays. In the zone code, particular uses will be identified as consistent or inconsistent and as exempt, or requiring self, code or impact assessment.  If a particular development requires code or impact assessment you will be required to lodge a development application.

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What is the difference between a code assessable and impact assessable development application?

A code assessable application requires assessment against the relevant Ipswich Planning Scheme codes, and is generally submitted for a use that is consistent with the zone in which the property is located. An impact assessable application requires assessment against all relevant Ipswich Planning Scheme matters, and is generally for a use that has a greater potential to have impacts on the surrounding area. Impact assessable applications also require public notification to be undertaken.

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What information is needed to accompany a development application?

Under the Planning Act 2016, a development application must be accompanied by:

  • The required Application Forms
  • The applicable application fee (refer to Council’s Register of Fees and Charges for the relevant financial year)
  • Relevant mandatory information, as specified on the application forms (such as plans, hours of operation, car parking arrangements etc).

It is recommended that you discuss additional supporting information requirements with Council prior to lodging your application.

Ipswich City Council also has a Development Application Lodgement Form to streamline the application lodgement process. Applicants are encouraged to provide a duly completed copy of this form with their application.

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How much will it cost me to submit a development application?

The cost of the development application will depend upon the type and scale of the proposed development. The costs of submitting a development application is specified in Council’s Register of Fees and Charges for the relevant financial year.

These application fees do not include the costs associated with preparing the development application (such as supporting information and consultants’ fees) and, in the event that Council requires a specialist study reviewed by an independent consultant, the additional cost of this review must also be paid by the applicant.

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How can I lodge a development application?

Council’s preference is that development applications are lodged electronically via email to plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au. This will help to speed up the process of having your application assessed. Council also maintains a Large File Transfer program called Hightail for the sending and receipt of large documents. If you are unable to submit your application electronically, a hard copy of the application can be submitted in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich, or posted to Ipswich City Council at PO Box 191, Ipswich QLD 4305.

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What is a referral agency and why are they important?

A referral agency is an agency outside Council, such as a State Government agency or an infrastructure provider, who has jurisdiction (as prescribed in Schedule 10 of the Planning Regulation 2017) to comment on a development application, in relation to the aspects of that application that are relevant to the agency. A referral agency can direct Council to impose conditions on a development permit or to refuse a development application. However the powers of some referral agencies are limited to providing advice on a development application only. It is normally the applicant’s responsibility to refer an application to the appropriate referral agencies. A referral agency may require a fee for the assessment of the proposed development. Please contact the referral agency directly regarding this matter.

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Public Notification for Impact Assessable Applications

Will I need to notify my neighbours when I lodge a development application?

If your application is impact assessable, you will be required to undertake public notification during the application process. The public notification process includes notifying adjoining owners. The State Government’s Guide on Public Notification outlines the requirements for undertaking public notification. (Note: this guide has not been updated to refer to the Planning Act 2016).

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A development application is currently undergoing Public Notification.  How do I make a submission about the application?

If an application is undergoing a formal Public Notification process, the application is impact assessable.  For a submission about a development application to be considered a “properly made submission”, it must be made to (and received by) Council during the notification period. The submission must:

  • include the name and residential or business address of each person who made the submission;
  • include the grounds of the submission and the facts and circumstances relied on in support of the grounds;
  • be made to the assessment manager; and
  • be in writing and signed by each person who made the submission.

If the submission is made on behalf of a number of submitters, it must also include a postal or email address that can be used for correspondence relating to the submission.

The submission can be sent via email to plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au, lodged in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich, or posted to Ipswich City Council, PO Box 191, Ipswich QLD 4305.

If an application is ‘code assessable’, there is no formal public notification process or associated appeal rights.  Notwithstanding, a submission can still be considered in the assessment of the application.

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Who can make a submission about a development application?

Anyone can make a submission to Council regarding a development application that is undergoing public notification.

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How long will it take for a development application to be processed?

The timeframe for processing development applications will vary depending on the type and complexity of an application. Some simple applications will be eligible for Council’s Fast Track Application process. Eligibility for Fast Track applications is determined on lodgement by Council officers, and the assessment will be finalised within five (5) business days of the receipt of all relevant material required for the assessment of the application to occur.

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How can I find out about development applications in my neighbourhood?

PD Online allows users to search applications using property details. Use the ‘Application Enquiry’ function and search by entering street name, street number and/or suburb details. Your search results will show any applications that have been lodged within the identified property, street or suburb. You can click on a particular application to view its status, and any public documents associated with the application.

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If I lodge a submission in relation to a development application will my submission be available for public viewing?

Submissions are not confidential and any submission will be published on Council’s PD Online website when it is received, including any contact details contained in your submission.  Should you wish for your contact details not to be published on Council’s PD Online website, it is necessary for you as the submitter to notify Council of such in writing as soon as possible.  Notwithstanding, please note that the content of your submission will remain on PD Online, and it is a requirement under the Planning Act 2016 that the decision notice for the application must include the name, residential or business address, and electronic address of each principal submitter.

If you not wish for your contact details to be included in the decision notice, we are unable to accept your submission as a properly made submission.  If your submission is not properly made, you will not have appeal rights in relation to the decision or be advised when the submitter appeal period commences.  However, you may follow the application stages through PD Online.

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If I am not happy with a development decision that is made by Council what can I do about it?

In accordance with the requirements of the Planning Act 2016, Council publishes a list of reasons for making a decision on a development application. This Statement of Reasons for an application is available via the application search on PD Online. If you are not happy with a development decision made by Council, it is advisable to first view Council’s reasons for making the decision. When reviewing the decision made, please note that in making a determination on a development application, Council will balance a range of considerations, seeking the best overall outcome for the community. If you are still concerned about the decision on the development application, you can contact the assessment manager assigned to the application to discuss the reasons why that particular decision was made by Council.

In the event you lodged a properly made submission within the Public Notification period for an impact assessable development application, you will be notified by Council when the ‘submitter appeal period’ commences. Once this period has commenced, you can lodge an appeal against the decision made by Council to the Planning and Environment Court, in accordance with the requirements identified in the Planning Act 2016.

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Other Development Matters

Are all development approvals available online?

All development applications for development assessable against the Ipswich Planning Scheme, where lodged after 1 January 2005, are available online. To obtain a copy of a development approval that is not available online, please contact Council’s Planning and Development Department during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888, via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au or in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich.

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Do I need an approval under the Ipswich Planning Scheme for a one-off, irregular or infrequent activity (e.g. helicopter landing, promotional activities, fete, wedding, party, circus, rodeo, etc)?

A development approval is not required for one-off, irregular or infrequent activities such as helicopter landings, promotional activities, fetes, weddings, parties, circuses and rodeos where it is determined by Council that there is unlikely to be any significant and/or detrimental impacts on the amenity of nearby land.  There may however be requirements (e.g. relating to events, public health or food hygiene), which need to be addressed or adhered to in respect of a local law or subordinate local law.

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Do I need to get Council approval before placing advertising signage within a property?

If a proposed advertising device complies with Schedule 9 – Exempt Advertising Devices, or meets the criteria for temporary advertising devices outlined in Subordinate Local Law 3.1 – (Commercial Licensing), a development application is not required. In all other circumstances, a development application will most likely be required, and will be assessed against the requirements of the Advertising Devices Code of the Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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Can I request Council inspect my development to confirm compliance with the conditions of development approval prior to commencement of use?

Prior to the commencement of a use, and in accordance with the conditions of the relevant development permit, it is the owner, occupier and/or operator of the proposed use that has responsibility for ensuring compliance with development conditions. Council’s Planning and Development Department has an active compliance program that regularly carries out development condition audits.

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Can I sell units on the same title separately?

It is not possible to sell individual units that are located on the same title.  Should you seek to individually sell units on the same title, you will need to ensure the units are ‘subdivided’ under a Building Format Plan. The Building Format Plan will need to be submitted to Council for review and approval, prior to formal lodgement of the document with the Title Office.

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Subdivision Plans

How do I lodge a subdivision plan with Council?

Subdivision plans and associated supporting documentation can be lodged in person at the Planning and Development counter on the ground floor of Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich, or posted to Ipswich City Council, PO Box 191, Ipswich QLD 4305.  Council’s Plan of Subdivision Lodgement Form must accompany each request for the signing of a subdivision plan.

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How long will it take for a subdivision plan to be signed by Council?

The standard timeframe for the assessment of a subdivision plan is twenty (20) business days, where all conditions of all approvals have been complied with and the required documentation submitted. Notwithstanding, Council strives to reduce this timeframe by assessing appropriate subdivision plans through  a ‘Fast Track’ assessment process for signing of a subdivision plan within five (5) business days. Signing of subdivision plan requests for minor or simple reconfigurations that do not require an operational works application may be considered for ‘Fast Track’ assessment.

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How much will it cost to submit a subdivision plan to Council?

The costs of submitting an application for the signing of a subdivision plan is specified in Council’s Register of Fees and Charges for the relevant financial year. Refer specifically to section 4.5.1 – Signing of Subdivision Plans.

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Heavy Vehicle Parking

Do I need to get a Heavy Vehicle Parking Permit to park my vehicle at my property?

If your vehicle is defined as a ‘Heavy Vehicle’, you will require a Heavy Vehicle Parking Permit to park your vehicle on your property. Refer to Council’s website for details regarding heavy vehicle specifications. If you intend to park more than one (1) heavy vehicle on your property, you will need to submit a development application for General Industry (Truck Depot). If this is the case, you are encouraged to contact Council for pre-lodgement advice regarding the suitability of your proposal, as an application for General Industry (Truck Depot) is unlikely to be supported in a residential area.

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How do I get a Heavy Vehicle Parking Permit and how long does it last for?

To obtain a Heavy Vehicle Parking Permit, you will need to submit an application to Council. If a permit is granted, it is valid for the financial year. An application for renewal is required each financial year thereafter.  The costs of submitting an application for a Heavy Vehicle Parking Permit is specified in Council’s Register of Fees and Charges for the relevant financial year.

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What sort of Heavy Vehicle Parking conditions will apply to my permit?

Specific conditions in relation to the make/model of the vehicle, where the heavy vehicle is parked on the premises, the service/repair and maintenance activities on the premises, the storage of materials and loading and unloading of the heavy vehicle may apply. Please refer to Implementation Guideline 16 – Heavy Vehicle Parking and the Heavy Vehicle Parking – Factsheet for more information.

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Infrastructure Charges

What are infrastructure charges and what do these charges go towards?

Infrastructure charges are the charges levied on development for the demand placed on the local government trunk infrastructure networks. The current charges are specified in the Ipswich Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.1) 2017. Council levies charges for trunk infrastructure networks for transport (roads), public parks and land for community facilities. Queensland Urban Utilities is responsible for water and sewerage infrastructure planning and charging under its Water Netserv Plan.

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What is the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) and how can I view it?

The Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) is part of the Ipswich Planning Scheme and identifies the local government’s plans for trunk infrastructure that are necessary to service urban development at the desired standard of service in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner. The LGIP is contained in Part 13 of the Ipswich Planning Scheme. Alternatively, a hard copy of the Ipswich Planning Scheme can be viewed at the Planning and Development counter in Council’s Administration Building at 45 Roderick Street, Ipswich.

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What is the Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution and how can I view it?

In accordance with the Planning Act 2016, a local government may, by resolution, adopt charges for providing trunk infrastructure for development. The adopted infrastructure charges can be set equal to or below the maximum adopted charge in the Planning Regulation 2017. The Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.1) 2017 can be accessed via PD Online.

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How can I pay my infrastructure charges?

Council only accepts payment for infrastructure charges by way of Bank Cheque, Cash or Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). Personal and/or company cheques will not be accepted as payment for developer contributions. For more information regarding payment options and details, contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 or email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au.

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Heritage

How can I tell if a property is heritage listed?

A property is ‘heritage listed’ if it is a local heritage listing or a state heritage listing.

Local
Schedule 2 – Character Places and Schedule 3 – Identified Places of Interest of the Ipswich Planning Scheme contain individual ‘local’ listings (character places).  Places listed in Schedule 2 – Character Places are formally protected. The ‘identified places of interest’ listed in Schedule 3 – Identified Places of Interest are not afforded statutory protection for demolition or removal but have been identified as sites where conservation is encouraged. The Ipswich Planning Scheme also includes Character Zones which include groupings of character places (e.g. ‘precinct listings’ and ‘heritage areas’). PD Online allows users to search properties by address. Using the search function you can enter street name, street number and suburb details, or a lot number and plan number. The search results will show the property as being affected by the Character Places overlay (if individual listed), or within a character zone. The same heritage protection provisions apply to Character Places that are individually listed in Schedule 2 – Character Places as are included within a Character Zone.

State
86 Ipswich buildings are on the Queensland Heritage Register, which is administered by the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection and the Queensland Heritage Council. The online entry includes images, significance, history, a description and a Google map reference for each site on the State register. You can search the Queensland Heritage Register online.

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What is the difference between a local character listing and a State heritage listing?

A State heritage listing protects places that have importance or significance to the State. Under the Queensland Heritage Act 1992, heritage approval or an exemption certificate must be sought from the Queensland Heritage Council to develop or change a state registered place. Development applications lodged on properties affected by a State heritage listing will require referral to the State Government as part of the application process.

A local heritage listing protects places that have importance or significance to the local community. Local heritage protections in Ipswich are identified in Schedule 2 – Character Places or Schedule 3 – Identified Places of Interest of the Ipswich Planning Scheme, or are located within a character zone of the Ipswich Planning Scheme.

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Does the same level of protection apply to a dwelling or building in a Character Zone as they do to an individually listed place?

Yes, a pre-1946 dwelling or building in a character zone has the same level of protection as a place that is individual listed in Schedule 2 – Character Places.

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Can I use a character/heritage listed building for a different use to its original use?

Generally, the adaptive reuse of character places is supported where the use allows the retention of the heritage and character significance of the place, and the reuse maintains a scale, intensity and appearance that is consistent with the amenity and character of the surrounding area. Implementation Guideline No. 26 - Adaptive Reuse of Character Places, Identified Places of Interest and Pre-1946 Buildings Located in Character Zones outlines the circumstances when character/heritage listed buildings can be used for a different use to its original use.

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How does the Ipswich Planning Scheme help to conserve Ipswich’s heritage buildings?

The Ipswich Planning Scheme protects places of local cultural heritage significance. Provisions in the Ipswich Planning Scheme concentrate on providing necessary safeguards relating to conserving the culturally significant fabric of the City. The Character Code in the Ipswich Planning Scheme provides a broad spectrum of information and diagrams to assist in conserving these important places.

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What assistance or advice can Council provide with respect to my character dwelling or building?

Council operates a Heritage Adviser Service to assist owners of historic Ipswich buildings. The Heritage Adviser is an experienced conservation architect who provides free conservation and architectural advice to owners of historic properties. The Heritage Adviser normally undertakes visits at the place in question to maximise convenience to residents and developers. To book an appointment with Council’s Heritage Adviser, please contact Council during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888.

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Naming & Street Numbers

Who is responsible for street naming and house numbering?

Ipswich City Council is responsible for street naming and the allocation of house numbering. To request street naming and/or house numbering, please send an email to plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au outlining the request. Street numbering is assessed in accordance with the Australian/New Zealand Standard for Rural and Urban Addressing.

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I have purchased a corner block. Is it possible to change my address to the other street?

House numbers are allocated in accordance with the Australian/New Zealand Standard for Rural and Urban Addressing.  In some circumstances, it is possible to change your address to the other street.  An investigation would need to be undertaken to ascertain the suitability of the proposed address in relation to the primary entrance to the property, and emergency service identification and access to the property. Please contact Council’s Technical Support Team on (07) 3810 6888 for more information.

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What is the naming process for roads, parks or bridges?

An application for naming of a road, park or bridge is to be submitted in writing. The application should be accompanied by information regarding the background/history of the proposed name and a duly completed copy of Council’s Naming Request Form.  Once an application for a road, park or bridge naming is submitted to Council, it will be considered by Council’s Technical Support Team. Duplicate names close to the site and the relevance of the proposed name to the area are key criteria against which proposed names are assessed.  Once a request has been considered and assessed, the applicant will be notified in writing of the approved name for the road, park or bridge. Council is responsible for naming both public and private roads.

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Can I find out the history behind my road naming?

It may be possible to find out the history behind your street or road’s name.  Where possible, Council officers will provide you with the history/background on the naming, and the date of the road naming approval. For more information, please contact Council’s Planning and Development Department during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888 or via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au.

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Energex and Telstra do not recognise my address to connect services to my dwelling. How do I confirm a street address?

Council officers are able to confirm your property’s official street address. For more information, please contact Council’s Planning and Development Department during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888 or via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au.

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Vegetation

How does Council protect important vegetation as part of development in Ipswich?

The Ipswich Planning Scheme has identified certain zones where important vegetation is required to be retained.  Within these zones, development applications must be assessed against the Vegetation Management Code to conserve and appropriately manage areas of native vegetation and their associated wildlife habitats and linkages.  Some vegetation is also afforded heritage protection, as outlined in Schedule 2 – Character Places. In accordance with Implementation Guideline 19 – Vegetation Retention in the Ipswich Planning Scheme, native vegetation within urban areas that cannot be retained as part of the development, is to be offset to achieve nil net loss of vegetation within the general locality.  The nil net loss may take the form of replanting on site in areas such as linear parks or a monetary contribution towards broader Council initiatives for vegetation planting or retention.

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How does Council protect natural waterways as part of development in Ipswich?

Many of the waterways within Ipswich are protected from development by their inclusion in the Recreation Zone as Linear Parks. Primarily, Linear Parks are designed to serve a connectivity/linkage function along riparian corridors.  The Vegetation Management Code and Reconfiguring a Lot Code in the Ipswich Planning Scheme also include provisions to protect natural waterways. These codes require vegetation within riparian areas to be conserved and appropriately managed, as well as management of stormwater flows to ensure any disturbance to natural riparian systems is minimised and contributes positively to the environmental enhancement of catchment areas.

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What approvals do I need to clear vegetation on my property?

Approval to clear vegetation on your property may depend on factors such as whether or not the vegetation has a cultural heritage listing, covenant requirements and/or applicable conditions of a development approval such as an Environment Protection Zone or Building Location Envelope. Restrictions on clearing of native vegetation are also dependent upon the zone within which the subject property is located and the physical attributes of the site such as slope and proximity to waterways. For more information, please contact Council’s Planning and Development Department during business hours (8am to 4.30pm) on (07) 3810 6888 or via email plandev@ipswich.qld.gov.au.

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Other Matters

Does my neighbour need to contribute towards the cost of our dividing fence?

Generally, neighbours are required to contribute equally to building and maintaining a sufficient dividing fence between their properties. If one owner wants to construct or carry out work on a fence beyond the standard for a sufficient dividing fence, that owner is generally liable for the additional costs. Your legal rights concerning a fence between your property and your neighbour’s property are covered by the Neighbourhood Disputes (Dividing Fences and Trees) Act 2011. More information about dividing fences is available on the State Government’s website.

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Who can assist with a neighbourhood dispute in relation to a dividing fence?

Whenever possible, you should solve any dispute directly with your neighbour. It is always better to reach an agreement with your neighbour and avoid the possibility (and costs) of a legal dispute. The State Government has developed a number of tips for resolving fencing disputes. Mediation offers an alternative way of settling disputes without the need for legal action. Mediation and dispute resolution is cheaper, easier and quicker than going to a court or tribunal.

The Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) can help resolve neighbourhood fence disputes valued up to $25,000. QCAT can also make a legally enforceable decision on the matter. Going to QCAT should be seen as a last resort. It’s much better if you can resolve the problem together and stay on good terms with your neighbour.

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Who is responsible for gaming and liquor licensing in Queensland?

Gaming (such as poker machines) and liquor licensing is regulated by the State Government (Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation) and not Council.

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Can I display signs and goods on the footpath?

Council’s Local Laws permit the erection of a range of temporary signs on footpath areas without an approval, provided that particular standards are achieved (such as location, length of time, size and number of signs). Council’s Subordinate Local Law 3.1 – (Commercial Licensing) sets outs the relevant provisions. Council’s Local Laws generally require a licence for any goods to be displayed on the footpath.

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